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About Us

If you or a family member happen to land in trouble, you want to know someone is there helping you to post the necessary funds for bail. With years working in the business, The Better Bail has earned a reputation as one of Brevard, Florida most trustworthy and reliable bail bond companies. We provide assistance in bail bonding to anyone who may need it, and we’ll make sure you are set free from your incarceration.

With our 24 hour bail bonds services, The Better Bail is used to taking calls for help both day and night. No matter what time it is, we are here for you.
We work with local jails to free people from custody by posting the bond for misdemeanors and felonies. And, on top of our helpful services, you can be sure that when you work with us, everything remains completely confidential.

 DUI Bonds services Rockledge

DUI Bonds

One of the most common reasons for a visit to jail is a DUI charge. One of the most common crimes, almost everyone has experience with it either first-hand or through someone they know. Because driving under the influence is one of the most common charges, DUI bonds are among the most common payments in the bail bond world.

While DUIs are common, they are serious crimes with far-reaching consequences. These consequences extend far beyond the night in jail that a DUI arrest causes, and can include fines, license suspensions, community service, and jail time. Multiple DUIs can result in felony charges and prison terms.

It doesn't take much to get a DUI charge, as many of those charged are coming home after a party or night out and assumed they were fine to drive. The law makes no exceptions, and if you're pulled over and blow a breathalyzer over the legal limit, you're under arrest. If you or a loved one have a pending DUI charge, you'll want to be prepared to fight for the best outcome - and that starts with getting out of jail quickly.

If you need DUI bonds in the Brevard County area, contact The Better Bail for more information. We offer fast, professional service and our team of licensed, professional bondsmen treat everyone with respect. Here, we believe in innocent until proven guilty and want to get you back to your life. Read on for everything you need to know about DUI law and bonds in Florida.

DUI Bonds - Everything You Need to Know
DUI Law in Florida

Florida is known for having some of the toughest DUI laws in the country. Like most states, they have a universal blood alcohol content limit of 0.08 as the threshold for drunk driving. If you are caught with a blood alcohol level over this while operating a motor vehicle, you will be charged.

Additional penalties are leveled if someone blows a 0.15 or higher, as that is considered a higher level of danger to the people around the drunk driver. For minors, there is a zero-tolerance policy for underage drinking and the threshold to be charged for drunk driving is reduced to 0.02 for those under 21. The number of drinks it takes to push someone over the threshold varies by body weight and alcohol tolerance.

Florida DUI law covers other substances beyond alcohol and the penalties are similar. Operating a vehicle under the influence of any chemical substance can result in a DUI if you are deemed to be driving recklessly. This includes illegal drugs, but can also include legal prescriptions if they affect your driving.

DUI Penalties in Florida
Florida has some of the harshest penalties for first-time offenders. The first DUI charge is a misdemeanor and can bring penalties of up to six months in jail, a $1000 fine, and fifty hours of community service. It is rare for first-time offenders to receive significant jail time, but that depends on the judge's discretion.

The penalties escalate for successive DUIs, with jail time more common for second-time offenders. The third DUI is often charged as a felony which can result in over a year in prison. Driver's licenses are also suspended for DUIs, with first-time offenses resulting in a six-month suspension of driving privileges.

Bail Bonds for DUI
If you or a loved one gets a DUI, you need to prepare for your day in court. That's a lot harder to do if someone is sitting in jail. While jail sentences for first time DUIs can often be avoided and tend to be short, the wait for your day in court can be longer.

While those charged with minor crimes are sometimes released on their own recognizance after promising to appear in court, this is rare for DUI cases. A DUI case will usually result in a cash bond where money is paid to the court to ensure the return of the accused and returned upon the conclusion of the case. The average misdemeanor DUI bond can range between $500 and $10,000, while felony DUI bonds can approach $50,000.

A surety bond can help you if you don't have the cash on hand to pay you or your loved one's bond. This bond has a third-party guarantee the bond for a percentage of the bond paid up front. This is where a bail bondsman can help you.

DUI Bonds in Brevard
If you or a loved one is sitting in jail for a DUI in Brevard County, you can be out sooner than you think. The Better Bail can arrange your bond and make it easier for you to get the best outcome in the case, so contact us to set up a consultation today.

Drug Charges

Drug charges are among the most common and the most complex criminal charges in the Florida court system. A large category encompassing a variety of illegal drugs and the improper possession or sale of prescription drugs without the right paperwork, the charges and sentences are as varied as the drugs involved. If you or a loved one have been arrested for drug-related crimes, your priority should be to get out of jail and face the charges head-on.

Florida has some of the toughest drug laws in the country, and it's common for drug arrestees to spend weeks or months in jail awaiting trial. For any drug charge, you'll want a lawyer and it's a lot easier to fight the charges on the outside. Every person facing a drug charge will get an arraignment, and that is the time to make the case for release or bail.

If you or a loved one is facing drug charges in the Brevard County area, don't let this opportunity pass you by. The Better Bail offers 24/7 service with flexible payment plans and no collateral, so you can get out of jail and back to your life. Read on to discover everything you need to know about drug-related charges in Florida.

Everything You Need to Know about Drug Charges in Florida
Florida Drug Laws

Drug charges in Florida can result in extensive prison sentences for felony convictions, but first-time offenders can get rehabilitation-focused sentences. A misdemeanor marijuana charge can carry up to a year in prison plus fines and community service, but judges will be receptive to alternatives that focus on drug treatment for first-time offenders.

A rehab-based sentence for a felony drug charge is possible, but the best chance is through a plea deal. If the prosecutor and judge can be convinced that the accused is a drug addict who only had hard drugs for personal use rather than for sale, a sentence that reduces the charges at the completion of rehab and probation is possible.

Accused drug traffickers get the harshest punishments under Florida law. A charge of a third-degree felony carries a sentence of up to five years in prison, but a first-degree drug trafficking charge can carry a sentence of up to thirty years in prison. Prosecutors are receptive to plea deals in these cases, but a sentence without significant jail time and a felony record is unlikely.

Bonding Out of Jail for Drug Crimes

If you or a loved one is in jail for drug-related charges, appeal for bond at the first court hearing. Most drug-related cases have bond granted, as jails do not have the capacity to hold everyone awaiting trial and only high-risk detainees are held without bail. However, bail in high-level drug cases can be set high enough that most people can't pay it.

A bond in a first-time misdemeanor marijuana case will be minimal, as little as $500. Felony bail will be higher, up to $10,000 for a first-time felony charge. Drug traffickers have been held on bail of as high as one million dollars. If you can't pay the bail in cash, a qualified bail bondsman can help with a surety bond - paying the bond for a fee of 10% to be kept by the bondsman.

Conditions of release are up to the prosecutor and judge and often include regular drug testing and visits with an officer of the court to ensure compliance.

Facing Drug-Related Charges? Get Out of Jail Now.

If you or a loved one is in jail on drug-related charges, it's possible to fight them from the outside with the help of a bail bondsman. Contact The Better Bail today to set up a bond consultation.

Theft and Robbery

If you or a loved one has been arrested for a theft or robbery charge in the Brevard County area, there are many variables to consider when determining how to proceed. Theft robbery charges are among the most common in the Florida criminal justice system, and they run the gamut from misdemeanors to serious felony charges. If you want to ensure the best outcome possible for the charges, the first step is to avoid sitting in jail longer than needed.

While some theft or robbery charges can carry serious jail time, they are largely assumed to be non-violent crimes. That means the accused is likely to be granted bond and get the chance to fight the charges from the comforts of home. It's much easier to get the help of a qualified attorney if you're free to work and earn money while seeking an acquittal or the best possible deal.

The best chance for a favorable outcome in a theft robbery case begins with bonding out of jail. The Better Bail in Brevard County offers 24/7 service with flexible payment plans, no collateral, and court date checks. Read on to discover everything you need to know about fighting theft and robbery charges in Florida.

Everything You Need to Know about Theft Robbery Charges in Florida
Types of Theft and Robbery Charges.

Theft covers a long list of crimes in Florida, but all involve the unauthorized taking of someone else's property. The determining factors in the severity of the charges are the value of the money or item taken, and the method used for taking it. Even a low-level theft can become a serious felony charge if a weapon is used in the theft.

Petit theft is a misdemeanor theft charge where the property is worth less than $300. Grand theft is a felony where the property is worth more than $300, and the severity of the crime escalates based on value. A $100,000 theft is a first-degree felony.

The two most common types of theft charges are burglary and shoplifting. Burglary involves the unlawful entry into a vehicle or building for theft, and this can be charged even if no property is taken. Shoplifting involves the stealing of merchandise or property from a business.

Carjacking is the violent taking of a car from the driver and is usually considered a violent felony. This is a separate crime from auto theft, which involves stealing a parked vehicle and is charged as grand theft.

Two theft-related crimes that don't involve the taking of physical property are dealing in stolen property and embezzlement. The former is an attempt to sell or transport previously stolen property if you had knowledge that it was stolen. Embezzlement is the appropriation of goods or money in a business or investment role.

Robbery is theft with the use of force. Strong-arm robbery involves the physical intimidation of a person or the use of unarmed violence to take property. Armed robbery is the theft crime with the highest sentence, and involves the use of a weapon to steal money or property.

Sentencing for Theft and Robbery Charges

With so many sub-categories of theft and robbery charges, the sentences vary dramatically. A first-time Petit theft convict is unlikely to face jail time and will serve a sentence of community service and probation. Repeated violations may result in county jail sentences, but as a misdemeanor significant jail time is unlikely.

For felony theft charges, the sentence depends on the amount stolen and the methods used to take it. A third-degree felony may receive jail time of up to five years in prison, but many first-time grand theft charges serve less than a year in prison or are pled down to lesser charges. First-degree felony charges can result in sentences of up to and above ten years in state prison.

Armed robbery is the crime punished most severely in this category, with mandatory minimum sentences starting at ten years for the use of a firearm. If the gun is discharged, the sentence goes up to twenty, and injuring or killing someone carries a minimum sentence of twenty-five years to life.

Bonding Out of Jail on Theft or Robbery Charges

Most first-time theft or robbery defendants will be granted bail at their arraignment. For misdemeanor defendants, they may be released on their own recognizance or given bail up to $1000. For felony grand theft defendants, bail will be higher and tied to the amount stolen.

Armed robbery suspects may be denied bail as a threat to the community, or bail will be high. High bails can be reached with the help of a certified bail bondsman putting down a Surety Bond.

Theft or Robbery Charges? Bond Out of Jail Now.

If you or a loved one is facing theft or robbery charges in the Brevard County area, there's no need to sit in jail until trial. Contact The Better Bail today to set up a bond consultation and see how we can get you or your loved one home.

Felony Charges Bonds

If you or a loved one has been charged with a felony crime in Florida, you need to know of the serious consequences that come with these charges. Felony charges are the most serious class of crimes in Florida law and carry with them the risk of serious jail time. The felony category refers to the severity of the crime and not the type and covers everything from repeated misdemeanor offenses to murder.

Most crimes can be charged as felonies if the alleged crime is severe enough, with misdemeanor crimes like theft, assault, and drug possession all carrying the risk of a felony charge at the discretion of the judge and prosecutor. Felony charges will carry higher bail than misdemeanors and many times the prosecutor will oppose bail. Being free on bail while awaiting trial gives you or your loved one a better chance of beating or reducing the charges.

The cost and strictures of bail for a felony charge can seem overwhelming, but it's possible to manage this difficult situation with the help of a registered bail bondsman. The Better Bail offers twenty-four-hour service with no collateral and flexible payment plans. Read on to discover everything you need to know about felony charges in Florida.

What You Need to Know about Felony Charges in Florida
Felony Charge Types and Sentencing

Florida criminal law has five types of felonies, divided by the potential punishment. All felony cases are also rated within their subcategory based on severity, with a scale of one to ten determining how likely it is that the accused gets a maximum sentence.

Third-degree felonies are the least severe felony cases, but they still carry a potential sentence of five years in prison or on probation, accompanied by a $5,000 fine. These are likely to be crimes like low-level grand theft or repeated misdemeanor offenses and can often be pled down.

Second-degree felonies more than double the punishment. Those facing a second-degree felony charge face up to fifteen years in prison or on probation, and a $10,000 fine. Many violent felonies like aggravated assault with a weapon fall under this category.

Third-degree felonies are the most serious type of common felony charge. They carry a sentence of no less than thirty years in prison or on probation, with a fine of $10,000.

There are two rarer types of felonies for the most severe crimes. Life felonies are those that carry a mandatory sentence of life in prison without a chance for probation or parole, coming with a $15,000 fine. These crimes include second-degree murder and certain sex and drug-related crimes.

Capital felonies are those that carry the possibility of the death penalty, with life imprisonment as an alternative. Only first-degree murder and related crimes like felony murder qualify as capital felonies.

The Felony Criminal Process

Those charged with felonies are treated as higher security risks than other crimes, and those charged need a well-organized criminal defense to increase their chances of success. The priority should be to seek release on bail. This is easier for third-and-second degree felonies.

No felony charge is likely to result in release without bond like a misdemeanor, but third-degree felony charges may result in low bail that can be met with the help of a bail bondsman. Second-degree felonies can get bail at as little as $10,000 if the accused is not deemed a flight risk. A third-degree felony charge is likely to receive high bail, as much as a million dollars, while those facing a life or capital felony charge are unlikely to receive bail.

If you or a loved one are facing a third-degree felony charge and do not have a criminal record, a prosecutor may be receptive to a sentence that includes probation and community service. It is possible to reduce a third-degree felony charge to a misdemeanor in a plea, which avoids a criminal record. Due to the severity of a felony charge, the help of a lawyer is recommended for the best odds of staying out of prison.

Facing a Felony Charge? Bond Out of Bail Now.

If you or a loved one is facing a felony charge, there's no need to sit in jail until the trial. Most felony cases are eligible for bail, and a qualified bail bondsman can arrange a Surety Bond for a small percentage of the bond. The Better Bail offers flexible payment plans and can work with high bonds, so contact us for a bond consultation today.

Violent Crime Bonds

If you or a loved one is in a Brevard County jail due to a violent crime charge, there's no need to wait in jail for your day in court. While violence-related charges are treated seriously in the Florida criminal justice system, most are eligible for bail for both misdemeanor and felony charges. We believe everyone is guilty until proven innocent, and the best odds to tackle violence-related criminal charges are when the accused is out of jail.

Violent crime is a broad category in the courts, ranging from misdemeanor assault to armed felony attempted murder. The strategy for each crime is different, but what unites them all is that the pre-trial process can be stressful for both the accused and their family. With a wide range of possible sentences and plea deals involved, the accused needs all resources at their disposal including strong legal representation.

Violence-related charges may result in higher bail than non-violent equivalents, but a certified bail bondsman can help you or your loved one bond out of jail. The Better Bail is a trusted name in the Brevard County bond business, offering twenty-four-seven service with no collateral and flexible payment plans. Read on to learn all you need to know about violent crime charges in Florida.

All You Need to Know about Violent Crime Charges in Florida
Types of Violence-Related Charges

While the most severe charges are likely to be denied bail, there are three categories of violence-related crimes that regularly offer bond. These are also the most common violent charges in the criminal justice system.

Assault is one of the most common charges, referring to the threat of violence. No physical contact is required for assault to take place, with either a word or gesture sufficient if someone fears imminent violence and the accused has the ability to carry out the threat. Assault can be charged as a misdemeanor or a felony.

Aggravated assault is an assault that's upgraded due to the involvement of a weapon. Whether a gun, knife, or blunt object, the use of a weapon upgrades the charges and the potential penalties. The weapon doesn't have to be used or fired - brandishing it is enough for an aggravated assault charge, but firing a weapon will result in harsher penalties.

Battery is the use of violence in an attack or unwanted touch. This can be as simple as grabbing or shoving someone, or more direct like a punch. If physical contact occurs without the victim's consent, it counts as battery and can be charged with assault if threats were present.

Aggravated battery is a more serious felony charge when battery involves a deadly weapon. Aggravated battery is also charged in cases of violence against a pregnant woman or battery that results in permanent scarring or disfigurement.

Sentencing for Violence-Related Charges

The sentences for charges of assault and battery in Florida vary drastically depending on the circumstances and the discretion of the judge and prosecutor. Both assault and battery can be charged as misdemeanors and felonies. Misdemeanor charges are common for altercations, bar fights, and other conflicts with no serious threat of deadly violence or severe bodily harm.

In misdemeanor cases, jail time is unlikely for first-time offenders. Prosecutors face a lot of these cases, and a guilty plea combined with community service and probation is likely. The accused, getting out without jail time or a felony record, regularly take these deals.

For felony aggravated assault and battery, these crimes are regularly charged as third-degree felonies with a sentence of five years in state prison. This can escalate if a firearm is used in the commission of a crime, upgrading the possible sentence to fifteen years.

Bonding Out of Jail on Violence-Related Charges

Except for first-degree felonies like attempted murder, bond is offered for most violence-related charges. First-time misdemeanor assault and battery clients are often released on minimal bail ranging from $500 to $2500, which can easily be attained with the help of a bail bondsman. Higher bail amounts are common for felony charges, ranging up to $100,000.

A Surety Bond from a certified bail bondsman can help clients reach high bail amounts, guaranteeing the sum with the court for a percentage of the bond paid up front.

Facing Violent Crime Charges? Bond Out of Jail Now.

If you or a loved one is facing a violence-related charge, getting out of jail and meeting with legal help is the best chance for a favorable outcome. Contact The Better Bail in Brevard County, Florida for a bond consultation today.

Domestic Violence Bonds

If you or a loved one is in a Brevard County jail due to a violent crime charge, there's no need to wait in jail for your day in court. While violence-related charges are treated seriously in the Florida criminal justice system, most are eligible for bail for both misdemeanor and felony charges. We believe everyone is guilty until proven innocent, and the best odds to tackle violence-related criminal charges are when the accused is out of jail.

Violent crime is a broad category in the courts, ranging from misdemeanor assault to armed felony attempted murder. The strategy for each crime is different, but what unites them all is that the pre-trial process can be stressful for both the accused and their family. With a wide range of possible sentences and plea deals involved, the accused needs all resources at their disposal including strong legal representation.

Violence-related charges may result in higher bail than non-violent equivalents, but a certified bail bondsman can help you or your loved one bond out of jail. The Better Bail is a trusted name in the Brevard County bond business, offering twenty-four-seven service with no collateral and flexible payment plans. Read on to learn all you need to know about violent crime charges in Florida.

All You Need to Know about Violent Crime Charges in Florida
Types of Violence-Related Charges

While the most severe charges are likely to be denied bail, there are three categories of violence-related crimes that regularly offer bond. These are also the most common violent charges in the criminal justice system.

Assault is one of the most common charges, referring to the threat of violence. No physical contact is required for assault to take place, with either a word or gesture sufficient if someone fears imminent violence and the accused has the ability to carry out the threat. Assault can be charged as a misdemeanor or a felony.

Aggravated assault is an assault that's upgraded due to the involvement of a weapon. Whether a gun, knife, or blunt object, the use of a weapon upgrades the charges and the potential penalties. The weapon doesn't have to be used or fired - brandishing it is enough for an aggravated assault charge, but firing a weapon will result in harsher penalties.

Battery is the use of violence in an attack or unwanted touch. This can be as simple as grabbing or shoving someone, or more direct like a punch. If physical contact occurs without the victim's consent, it counts as battery and can be charged with assault if threats were present.

Aggravated battery is a more serious felony charge when battery involves a deadly weapon. Aggravated battery is also charged in cases of violence against a pregnant woman or battery that results in permanent scarring or disfigurement.

Sentencing for Violence-Related Charges

The sentences for charges of assault and battery in Florida vary drastically depending on the circumstances and the discretion of the judge and prosecutor. Both assault and battery can be charged as misdemeanors and felonies. Misdemeanor charges are common for altercations, bar fights, and other conflicts with no serious threat of deadly violence or severe bodily harm.

In misdemeanor cases, jail time is unlikely for first-time offenders. Prosecutors face a lot of these cases, and a guilty plea combined with community service and probation is likely. The accused, getting out without jail time or a felony record, regularly take these deals.

For felony aggravated assault and battery, these crimes are regularly charged as third-degree felonies with a sentence of five years in state prison. This can escalate if a firearm is used in the commission of a crime, upgrading the possible sentence to fifteen years.

Bonding Out of Jail on Violence-Related Charges

Except for first-degree felonies like attempted murder, bond is offered for most violence-related charges. First-time misdemeanor assault and battery clients are often released on minimal bail ranging from $500 to $2500, which can easily be attained with the help of a bail bondsman. Higher bail amounts are common for felony charges, ranging up to $100,000.

A Surety Bond from a certified bail bondsman can help clients reach high bail amounts, guaranteeing the sum with the court for a percentage of the bond paid up front.

Facing Violent Crime Charges? Bond Out of Jail Now.

If you or a loved one is facing a violence-related charge, getting out of jail and meeting with legal help is the best chance for a favorable outcome. Contact The Better Bail in Brevard County, Florida for a bond consultation today.

Sex Crimes Bonds

If you or someone you know has been arrested for a sex-related crime, understanding the charges and consequences is important for the best chance at a positive outcome. Sex crimes are among the most complex cases in the Florida criminal justice system, carrying not just the chance for imprisonment and probation but mandatory registration on Florida's sex offender registry. This long-term consequence means qualified representation is necessary when facing any sex-related charge.

Sex crimes in Florida cover a large range of charges, ranging from misdemeanors like prostitution-related crimes and indecent exposure to felony sexual assault. The potential sentences vary with the charges, as do the likely bond requirements. A sex-related charge is also likely to carry additional bond requirements including restraining orders.

When incarcerated for a sex-related charge in Brevard County, the priority should be to bond out of jail so the focus can shift to fighting the charges. The Better Bail is a registered bail bond operator that offers twenty-four/seven service with no collateral and flexible payment plans. Read on to learn everything you need to know about sex crimes in Florida.

Everything You Need to Know about Sex Crimes in Florida.
Types of Sex Crime Charges

Most sex crime charges eligible for bail that carry the risk of jail or sex offender registration fall into three primary categories.

Prostitution is the category that results in most sex crime charges because it covers a wide range of activities. Offering to engage in prostitution is a misdemeanor, as is soliciting a prostitute or entering a location that offers sex services. Prostitution-related crimes can be upgraded to felonies when sex trafficking is involved, which includes forcing another person into prostitution or owning a building that is used for prostitution.

Sexual assault is the second category, a broad group of crimes that ranges from unwanted touching like groping to felonies like attempted rape and aggravated sexual assault. This can be a misdemeanor or a first-degree felony based on the circumstances.

Sexual assault occurs when a victim is subjected to unwanted sexual contact or is coerced or forced into sexual interaction. A person that is inebriated or physically or mentally incapacitated is also a victim of sexual assault if they could not consent.

The third category of sex-related crimes is indecent exposure. This is when a person intentionally displays their genitals in public. This is a first-degree misdemeanor but comes with a burden of proof for the state to show the exposure was intentional.

Penalties for Sex-Related Crimes in Florida

The penalties for sex-related crimes in Florida vary from probation and community service to lengthy jail sentences. Prostitution-related crimes average the lowest sentences due to the number of people arrested each year. First-time sex workers and "Johns" are often able to avoid jail time with diversion programs, community service, and probation.

Indecent exposure charges are first-degree misdemeanors, carrying a sentence of up to a year in jail and a fine. Most first-time misdemeanor convictions do not result in jail terms, but the penalty can increase for repeated offenses and depending on who was exposed.

Sexual assault charges have the widest range of sentences. Unwanted touching or groping is often charged as simple battery, a misdemeanor that lets the accused to plead guilty and serve probation and community service. Sexual assault of an incapacitated person is charged as a third-degree felony with sentences of up to five years of state prison, and the use of a weapon in a sexual assault can upgrade the charges and result in prison terms of up to fifteen years.

The Florida Sex Offender Registry

Even sex-related crimes that have short sentences or no jail time can carry with them another consequence - registry on Florida's sex offender registry. This can impact your social and employment prospects, so avoiding that can be a key factor in taking a plea deal or fighting the charges. Florida has one of the toughest sex offender registry laws in the country.

The law requires lifetime sex offender registration for the following crimes - kidnapping, false imprisonment, luring a child, sexual battery, unlawful sexual activity with a minor, procuring a minor for prostitution, taking part in the prostitution of a minor, indecent exposure to a minor under sixteen years old, indecent exposure to an elderly or disabled person, possession or transport of child pornography, and sexual misconduct.

Bonding Out of Jail on Sex-Related Charges

Sex charges are treated similarly to other crimes with bail, and most misdemeanor crimes will be eligible for low bail of under $2500. They may come with additional conditions like a restraining order barring contact with the alleged victim. Felony sexual assault or sex trafficking charges will come with higher bail, up to $100,000, which can be reached with the help of a Surety Bond from a qualified bail bondsman.

In Jail on Sex Crime Charges? Get Home Now

If you or a loved one is facing sex-related charges in Brevard County, the best odds for fighting the charges start with bonding out of jail. Contact The Better Bail to set up a bond consultation today.

White Collar Crimes Bonds

If you or a loved one is in jail in Brevard County for white collar crimes, this area of criminal charges can be hard to understand. A non-violent type of financial crime, white collar crimes are committed for financial gain and refer to the use and abuse of money. A class of theft or deception, these crimes were originally designated to differentiate between the crimes of the upper-income class and the lower-income class.

While white-collar crimes are considered non-violent, they are treated seriously by the state because a large sum of money may be involved and they risk undermining faith in the financial and legal professions. White collar defendants are granted bail except in extreme circumstances due to minimal risk to the public, but bail is often high and conditions for release can be strict. A qualified bail bondsman is often the only way to meet the high bail sum.

When getting ready to fight these charges, the best way to start is by getting yourself or your loved one out of that holding cell. The Better Bail is a registered bail bond agency offering 24/7 service with flexible payment plans and no collateral. Read on to learn everything you need to know about fighting white-collar crime charges in Florida.

Everything You Need to Know About White Collar Criminal Charges
Types of White-Collar Crimes

White-collar crimes are financial crimes violating laws governing theft, deception, and misrepresentation. This class of crimes covers a wide range of activities.

Forgety is the willful misleading of someone through a faked or altered document or object, including counterfeit money or fake checks.

Bribery is the act of giving an official a gift to get personal favors, and both parties in a bribe can be charged.

Fraud is a broad term referring to the intentional misleading of a person for personal gain, or to using false information to damage someone's reputation.

Identity theft is a sub-type of fraud referring to presenting yourself as someone else for the purpose of usurping their resources, and includes taking out credit cards in someone's name.

Embezzlement is when someone misappropriates funds they have control over for safekeeping and uses them for personal use.

Money laundering is the taking of money from criminal activity and representing it as legal funds.

The Legal Process for White-Collar Crimes

Arrests for white-collar crimes happen after a preliminary investigation and the accused may be notified before the arrest to allow them to self-surrender. This depends on the discretion of the prosecutor, and as white-collar crimes are almost always felonies, it is unlikely the accused will bond out before their arraignment. If you are charged with a white-collar crime, your first two calls should be to a criminal defense lawyer and a bail bondsman, as you will need both.

The sentences for white-collar crimes vary dramatically based on the money stolen, the number of criminal charges, and the criminal record of the accused. Prosecutors often charge individual instances of fraud or money laundering as separate crimes, leading to lengthy potential sentences. For first-time offenders, seeking a favorable plea deal is the best approach and offering restitution of any money taken goes a long way to reducing charges.

Prosecutors may lay out sentencing guidelines asking for as much as forty years in prison for multiple counts, but this is a scare tactic to push plea deals. First-time white-collar criminals who plead guilty and make restitution often get as little as a year in prison or in home confinement.

The Bail Process for White-Collar Crimes

It is rare for bail to be denied for white-collar crimes, since the defendant is rarely argued to be a security risk to the community. However, high bail is often assigned for cases with a lot of money missing or multiple counts of fraud. With bail sums over $100,000 common for high-profile cases, clients partner with a bail bondsman for a Surety Bond to the court and pay a non-refundable fee of around 10% to the bondsman.

It is common for additional conditions to be added to the release if the defendant is deemed to be a flight risk. Electronic monitoring or home confinement are more common for white-collar crimes, but still allow the defendant the comforts of home and easy access to an attorney.

Facing Trial for White-Collar Crimes? Bond Out Now.

If you or a loved one is facing a felony charge, there's no need to sit in jail until the trial. Most felony cases are eligible for bail, and a qualified bail bondsman can arrange a Surety Bond for a small percentage of the bond. The Better Bail offers flexible payment plans and can work with high bonds, so contact us for a bond consultation today.

If you or a loved one is facing trial for white-collar crimes, the road to prison starts with getting out of county jail. The Better Bail is taking on new clients in the Brevard County era, so call us for a free bond consultation today.

Disorderly Conduct Bonds

Disorderly conduct is one of the most common criminal charges, and one of the easiest to get. A second-degree misdemeanor, it covers a wide range of behaviors that are deemed to be disturbing the peace. Making it more complicated, this charge is entirely at the discretion of the local police and can turn a good time or a minor interpersonal conflict into a criminal charge.

Clients charged with disorderly conduct have stories like getting a little too noisy while celebrating a sports win, or hosting a party that got too many noise complaints, or an argument that was already resolved when the police arrived. A simple night out combined with a police officer who has had a hard day can lead to a night in jail and pending criminal charges.

The good news is, as a second-degree misdemeanor, this charge can often be pled down and lead to no jail time and minor fines, community service, and probation. The bad news is that the wait for your day in court can be much longer than any penalty for the charge if you're stuck in jail. That's why getting bailed out so you can concentrate on dealing with the charges is essential.

If you or a loved one is facing a disorderly conduct charge in the Brevard County area, contact The Better Bail for help. We offer bail bonds for all criminal charges at reasonable rates and pride ourselves on our customer service. Read on to learn all you need to know about disorderly conduct charges in Florida.

Disorderly Conduct in Florida - All You Need to Know
Disorderly Conduct Law in Florida

Disorderly conduct is a broad classification for a second-degree misdemeanor that covers anything that disturbs the peace. Anything that makes people feel afraid, alarmed, annoyed, or unable to carry on as normal can be charged with this crime. Common causes for this charge include fighting, threatening behavior, loud offensive language in public, loud music or other noise, or refusing to disperse a crowd.

A subset of this charge is disorderly intoxication, which is also a second-degree misdemeanor. This is charged when a drunk individual or someone under the influence of another substance causes a disturbance or poses a danger to themselves or others.

Disorderly Conduct Penalties in Florida

As a second-degree misdemeanor, most charges of disorderly conduct do not result in harsh sentences for the first offense. The maximum penalties include sixty days in jail, fines, six months of probation, or community service according to the discretion of the judge. Jail time is unlikely for first-time offenses barring extenuating circumstances or a judge in a bad mood.

Repeated offenses can result in escalating sentences, with jail time being more common. Prosecutors, dealing regularly with this charge cases as a large part of their caseload, will often offer plea deals for this charge. That means your priority should be to get yourself or your loved one out of jail so you can respond appropriately to the charge.

Disorderly Conduct Bonds in Florida
As this is a second-degree misdemeanor, it is common for those charged to be released on their own recognizance if they promise to return for their hearing. However, a no-nonsense judge or a defendant with previous charges may result in a larger bond. If a defendant facing this charge cannot make bond, they might spend far more time in jail awaiting trial than they would if sentenced.

Bonds in these cases are lower than the average and can be as little as $25 or as high as $1000. It is rare for a first-time offender to get a higher bond, but even this modest sum can cause problems for someone living paycheck to paycheck. A surety bond can guarantee the money through a third party and can be paid through a certified bail bondsman for a percentage of the bond paid up front and kept by the bondsman as a fee.

Get Bailed Out of Jail Now

If you or a loved one are facing a disorderly conduct charge, there's no reason to sit in jail. The bond for this crime is low, and a bail guarantor can take care of the up-front fee for a reasonable percentage. You or your loved one will be free to get back to life and focus on getting this pending charge off your back.

The Better Bail offers qualified and fair bail bond services in the Brevard County area for clients facing a wide range of criminal charges. Contact us for a bail bond consultation today.

Weapons Crimes Bonds

If you or a loved one has been arrested for a weapons crime, it's important to take the situation seriously. While Florida is a state with strong gun rights laws, they back that up with some of the harshest laws in the country for weapons crimes. Enacted in 1999, a Florida law punishes the use of a firearm in the commission of a crime with a minimum ten to twenty-year mandatory sentence, with a minimum of twenty if the gun is fired and twenty-five to life if someone is injured or killed

Not all weapons-related crimes involve the commission of a separate crime. Certain classes of people are not allowed to carry a concealed weapon, mostly those convicted or accused of a separate crime. Possession of a gun while barred by law can be charged as a felony, as can carrying a concealed weapon without the proper permits.

It's easier to fight criminal charges with the help of a lawyer if you or your loved one are out of jail. When seeking bond on a weapons charge, a qualified bail bondsman can help. The Better Bail in Brevard County offers 24/7 service with flexible payment plans and no collateral, making it easier for anyone to make bond.

Read on to learn everything you need to know about weapons crimes in Florida.

Everything You Need to Know about Weapons Crimes in Florida
What Are the Different Weapons-Related Crimes?

The most serious weapons charge is using a weapon in the commission of a crime. This is a crime with little wiggle room, as it carries a mandatory sentence of ten to twenty years in prison even if the gun is only brandished and not fired. The sentences escalate if the gun is fired or used to wound someone, and the only chance of a lesser sentence is with a plea deal for lesser charges.

The second class of weapons crimes is the possession of a firearm when legally prohibited. The following groups of people are banned from owning firearms in Florida - anyone convicted of a felony, anyone with a current restraining order for stalking or harassment, anyone on the run from the law, and anyone convicted of misdemeanor domestic assault. Being caught with a gun under any of these conditions can land you in jail facing a felony charge for illegal possession of a firearm.

Carrying a concealed firearm is legal in Florida with the proper permits, but the permit must be applied for and anyone caught with an unlicensed concealed firearm will face a third-degree felony charge. Carrying other concealed weapons like knives can result in a first-degree misdemeanor charge.

Penalties for Weapons-Related Crimes

While the penalties for using a gun in the commission of a crime are harsh and inflexible, other weapons charges give the judge and prosecutor much more leeway. A third-degree felony charge for illegal possession of a weapon can carry a sentence of between two and ten years in prison, but a first-time offender who didn't use the weapon in a crime isn't facing a mandatory minimum and may be allowed to plea down to a lesser charge.

A weapons charge while facing other charges or legally barred from carrying a firearm will result in a harsher sentence. A misdemeanor charge for carrying a non-firearm weapon can carry a sentence of up to a year in prison, but most first-time offenders are offered plea deals for probation and community service.

Bail for Weapons Charges

When someone is arrested on a weapons charge, they will be held until their initial arraignment. Whether bail is offered will depend on the discretion of the judge and the severity of the crime. Those arrested for violent crimes while using a weapon will either be denied bail or face heavy bail that can be reached with the help of a bail bondsman.

Bailing out of jail for weapons charges will be easier for third-degree felonies such as illegal possession, although compounding factors such as criminal history will raise the bail money. The average bail money will be between $1000 and $10000. Misdemeanor weapons charges will either result in a low bail or a first-time offender may be released on their own recognizance.

Weapons Charge? Get Out of Jail Now

If you or a loved one has been arrested on a weapons charge in the Brevard County area, your best bet to get the upper hand is by getting out of jail and seeking legal representation. A qualified bail bondsman can help by putting up the bond money, so contact The Better Bail to set up a bond consultation today.

Probation Violations

Probation is an alternative to a jail or prison sentence that allows someone convicted of a crime to continue their normal life, living at home and going to work while under the supervision of a court. The trade-off for this freedom is that the probationer is supervised by an officer of the court who sets conditions for their continued release. All probation cases have different conditions, but breaking any of the rules set by the court results in the criminal category named probation violations.

Probation is offered as an alternative to jail in misdemeanor and some felony cases, and probation violations can result in the probationer being arrested to face the court. A violation will result in the revision of the terms of probation, which can include stricter terms for the duration of probation. It can also result in a prison term, or the revocation of probation and an equivalent jail sentence being imposed.

If you or someone you know has been arrested for a probation violation, your first step should be to obtain release from jail so the charges can be fought more easily. A registered bail bondsman can help you get the money you need for bond, and The Better Bail in Brevard County, Florida offers 24/7 service with flexible payment plans and no collateral. Read on to discover your next steps if you or a loved one is arrested for a probation violation.

Everything You Need to Know About Probation Violations
What are the Common Terms of Probation?

Every probation case is different and the conditions depend heavily on the temperament of the judge and the assigned probation officer. Some common conditions of probation include regular check-ins with a probation officer, allowing them to keep tabs on your actions and check your progress. The court may assign counseling sessions or visits to support groups, especially if the crime is substance-related like a DUI.

Random drug tests are also a common condition of probation, with the regularity depending on the crime and the probationer's history. Probationers often have travel restrictions, but this can be flexible depending on the probationer's job. Common restrictions involve staying within the home state, although more restrictive conditions are possible.

Probationers are often expected to make restitution for their crimes. This can include return of stolen property or payment of fines. A set number of community service hours at approved non-profits is also common. There may also be restrictions on associations, such as a ban on probationers fraternizing with anyone who has had a criminal conviction.

Common Causes of Probation Violations

A probation violation can happen because of any breach in the terms of probation, but the most common type is a failed random drug test. This can also result in additional drug charges beyond the violation, which may affect the bond. Missing a meeting with the probation officer is a common cause of violation, although judges may be forgiving if the probationer can show legitimate cause for a delay.

Violation of fraternization or travel regulations can cause a violation, and those are likely to result in harsher sanctions unless the probationer can prove an accidental violation. At the end of a probation term, the probationer's compliance with long-term obligations like community service will be assessed.

Consequence of a Probation Violation

Upon a probation violation, the probationer is arrested barring the discretion of the probation officer. This functions similarly to any other arrest, as the probationer will be held in jail until arraignment and bond is set. Bond may be denied for serious or repeated violations and the probationer will be held until a trial or the conclusion of the sentence.

The average bail for a probation violation can be as little as $500 or as much as $10000. For the higher sums, a surety bond is the easiest way to get the probationer out of jail with the help of a bail bondsman. At the probation hearing, there is no right to a jury hearing and the judge will make the decision whether to increase conditions or revoke probation.

As probation is typically given for misdemeanor or low-level felony crimes, the maximum sentence for a probation violation can be one to three years in prison. This can be extended if the violation causes additional charges.

Fight a Probation Violation from Home

If you or a loved one has been arrested for a probation violation, you want all resources at your disposal. It's a lot easier to build your defense from home, so bonding out of jail should be the first step. Contact The Better Bail in Brevard County, Florida to set up a bail consultation today.

Juvenile Crimes Bonds

One of the scariest calls any parent can get begins "Mom/Dad, I'm in jail". If your child has been arrested, they'll be looking to you to help them through this difficult period. The legal process for dealing with juvenile crimes differs greatly from the system for adult crimes, and this gives parents an advantage in getting their child home safely sooner.

The adult justice system is designed to punish and deter, but the juvenile justice system seeks to rehabilitate and supervise young convicts with the end goal being them rejoining society as fully functioning citizens. Until 2013, juveniles could not bond out of detention centers unless they were charged with more serious adult crimes, but the Supreme Court ruling Treacy v. Lamberti in 2013 cleared the way for most young arrestees to go home while awaiting trial.

If you have a child in a Brevard County juvenile jail, they don't have to stay there until their hearing. Once bond is set, The Better Bail offers 24/7 service with no collateral and flexible payment plans. Read on to find everything you need to know about dealing with juvenile crimes and how to get your son or daughter out of detention quickly.

Everything You Need to Know About Juvenile Crimes
What Happens When a Juvenile is Arrested?

The juvenile justice system requires speedy action, meaning your child won't be sitting in jail for days waiting for a hearing. Juvenile detention facilities are run by Florida's Department of Children and Families, and a counselor will assess every arrestee to determine if they should be kept in custody or released to their parents. If held in custody, the juvenile must get a hearing before a judge in less than twenty-four hours, and if bond is denied their trial must begin within twenty-one days.

At the first court hearing, the judge will determine if the juvenile is to be tried as an adult. Most juvenile crimes are charged as minors and go through the juvenile justice system, but more serious crimes like violent crimes, sex crimes, or other felonies can be upgraded to adult charges. If your child is charged as an adult, they are eligible for standard Florida bond depending on the severity of the crime.

Juveniles in the Adult System

For a juvenile to be tried as an adult for a crime, the prosecution must show the seriousness of the crime and make the case that the juvenile is a danger to the public. This is most common for repeat offenders and violent crimes. In the adult system, juveniles still have protections. The jail officials must keep the juvenile offenders away from adult offenders, and they can still only be held for six hours before being released to parents or a DCF facility.

The minimum age for a juvenile to be tried as an adult is sixteen, and they must have been charged with a violent crime, a forcible felony, or a stolen vehicle crime that resulted in harm to an individual. If a juvenile is charged as an adult, they can be held until trial segregated from adult inmates, or they can be bonded out in the adult system.

Bailing a Juvenile Out of Jail
If your child is kept in the juvenile justice system, they can only be held for twenty-one days before the trial. That period can still cause major disruption in a family's life and in your child's education, so bond is available. High cash bail is unusual for juvenile detainees, as they are released to their parents.

The biggest factor in a judge determining to grant bond to a juvenile detainee is the recommendation of the DCF official. They will be looking at the family to determine if it's a safe and stable environment, and if the juvenile is likely to re-offend if released. If bail is set, it will be on the low end and a bail bondsman can pay it for a small percentage of the overall bail as a fee.

Juvenile court hearings are informal and the judge is working with the DCF official and the parents to find a solution that aids the child's rehabilitation. It is common for a plea deal to be offered at the initial court hearing, allowing the offender to admit guilt and take a sentence of probation and community service. In those cases, bail isn't issued and your child can come home with you immediately if the deal is taken.

Get Your Child Out of Jail Now

If you have a child in the juvenile justice system in the Brevard County area, you don't have to navigate this stressful time alone. The Better Bail can help you prepare for your child's court hearing and afford the bail to get them home, so call us for a bond consultation today.

Fast Jail Release with The Better Bail

Once we initiate the process of bail, it typically only takes a few hours to secure release. Throughout this time, we remain in contact to provide updates and offer reassurance. We believe wholeheartedly in innocence until guilt gets proven. Unfortunately, most people cannot afford the full amount of their bail. As licensed bail bondsmen, we enable the exercise of a constitutional right for freedom until sentencing.

To secure a bail bond for a currently incarcerated individual, trust The Better Bail in Melbourne, Cocoa Beach, Satellite Beach, Melbourne Beach, Titusville, Port St. John, Cape Canaveral, Mims, Merritt Island, Rockledge, Indialantic, Malabar, Micco and Palm Bay, FL. For more information, or to initiate the bond process, call us anytime at (321) 806-4331.
 

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Chad R. McCurdy

BAIL BOND AGENT

Chad R. McCurdy is a Bail Bond Agent with The Better Bail. Mr. McCurdy grew up in Amarillo, Texas where he attended Highland Park High School until graduation. He then joined the United States Air Force in 1988 as an Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician. After graduating the Department of Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal School at Indian Head, MD Mr. McCurdy was assigned to Bitburg Air Base Germany. While stationed in Germany he was deployed his first time at the age of 20 to Desert Shield/Desert Storm. Mr. McCurdy was assigned to the 3rd Special Force Group while in Saudi Arabia and deployed to Kuwait City for its liberation. Mr. McCurdy was awarded a Bronze Star with Valor for his work with the Special Forces Group. Throughout his time in the Air Force Mr. McCurdy had several Combat Deployments and was assigned overseas to Germany and Italy and in the United States to North Carolina, New Mexico and three bases in Florida. His professional awards include two Bronze Stars with valor, one Meritorious Service Medal, one Army Commendation Medal with Valor, five Air Force Commendation Medals, 6 Air Force Achievement Medals, Humanitarian Medal as well as other awards and medals.

While Mr. McCurdy was in the Air Force he graduated from the American Military University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminal Justice, a Bachelor of Arts in Intelligence Studies and a Master of Science in Cyber Security. During his tenure in the military Mr. McCurdy worked with United States’ Secret Service on Presidential details and with the U.S. State Department on diplomat security details. He retired from Military Service in 2009 and started working for the Department of Homeland Security as an Explosive Specialist. In 2014 Mr. McCurdy started his employment at Florida Technical College as a Professor of Criminal Justice program, where he progressed to the Academic Lead. 2017 Mr. McCurdy started became a bail bond agent and has worked this career path since. Mr. McCurdy has a son that joined the Army and graduated the Department of Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal School and is now going to college at UCF majoring in Business Management. As of now Mr. McCurdy lives in Cape Canaveral, Florida.  

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